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This is a great state park in Texas just about 30 minutes south of Houston. It features alligators and a nice variety of bird life.

Camera was a Nikon D7100 and the lens a Sigma 150- 600, effectively with the crop a 225 – 900. It is a large lens, of course, and it is even suggested that a monopod is the minimum support requirement. However, use a high enough ISO and shutter speed and that impediment to quick response to wildlife subjects (the monopod) can be fairly well avoided.

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The shallow depth of field of a super telephoto allowed me to give sharp focus to the end of the snout and its reflection while making a pleasant blur in the other areas.

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While the alligator looks sluggish, it’s said that they can dart out of the water fairly quickly to seize its victim (or camera-wielding tormentor). I wouldn’t have done this with a 50mm lens! He or she seems somewhat perturbed.

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Now on the nicer side, a gallinule calmly graces the ripples with its vibrant beak looking like a corn candy.

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Here is a group of gallinules in the fen.

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The American bittern stalks its unwary fare.

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Maw and Paw blue-winged teal rest on the lounge log.

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I did shoot some black and white with a Fuji GA something or other 6 x 4.5 film camera, but here is a quickie digital rendition.

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The ibis prepares to pounce.

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The lazy gator a log mounts.

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Gallinule walks the branch.

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Double crested cormorant.

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Gallinule and cormorant.

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Great blue heron surveys his or her domain.

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Ibis shows off for the gallinules. They are common, after all.

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A herd of ibis feeds.

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Ibis herd, another view.

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Three ibises.

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Common grebe.

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More gallinule action.

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Common egret I.

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Common egret II.

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Common egret three, frazzled.

The Sigma 150-600 is a reasonable solution to the common wildlife photographer who’d like to “get out there” a little further!